Monday, November 22, 2010

The Elegant Keraton Yogyakarta

The palace of Yogyakarta, known as the Keraton (also spelled kraton or karaton), is a grand complex that was meticulously planned to reflect the Javanese cosmos. This splendid example of traditional Javanese architecture has no equal. Designed and built in stages, the Keraton was completed in 1790.

This elegant complex of pavilions was constructed entirely on ancient beliefs and each feature of the complex, from the courtyards to the trees, has a special symbolic meaning related to sophisticated Javanese philosophy.

 The Keraton is built facing directly north towards the majestic Mt. Merapi with to its south backing the Indian Ocean which is believed to be the abode of Nyi Loro Kidul, the Queen of the South Seas and the mystical consort of the Sultan. Malioboro road was originally used as the ceremonial route, not unlike London’s Pall Mall, and forms a straight line drawn from the Sultan’s palace to the Merapi volcano.

A green square called alun-alun  fronting the palace, has a large banyan tree in its center, while behind the palace is another similar square. When a sultan dies, the cortege leaves by the southern gate on its way to the cemetery of kings at Imogiri.

This palace was designed to be more than just a royal residence. It was built to be a focal point of the Sultan’s entire kingdom. Today, the Keraton is a piece of living history and tradition. It continues to be used, both as a home of the Sultan as well as for other important ceremonial and cultural  functions of the Yogya court.  

The present Sultan Hamengku Buwono X of Yogyakarta retains the title of Sultan although Yogya has become one of the provinces of the Republic of Indonesia. The Sultan of Yogya,is also the governor of the province, and is still considered the cultural head of this region, and is greatly loved by his subjects.  

Even with Yogya’s modernization, the Keraton of Yogya continues to be respected by the people of Yogya, steeped as it is in mysticism and philosophy. In the afternoons, after the palace is closed to visitors, women in traditional costume can be seen respectfully sprinkling water and flowers on the pillars, lighting incense to “cleanse” the keraton from evil spirits.


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13 komentar:

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Admin said...

nice info :)

geo said...

budaya yang wajib kita jaga bersama...

Dian said...

Nice info..
Thankyou..
keep posting.. :D

mutualbehavior said...

thanks for sharing about yogyakarta to the world!. may be you want to see something about paket kredit mobil

Araya said...

nice posting

Janeth said...

hello there..nice site..bloghopping and following..hope to see you around!

blackclouds said...

mampir subuh...sambil baca-baca....

reepkun said...

nice blog kakak ;;)

yoedha said...

laen kali posting tntang Yogyakarta lagi ya..
cuma ane org jgj..
ahahahaha..
biar trkenal..

bisnisku said...

terima kasih artikelnya

wongcrewchild said...

mengagumkan, blom pernah kesana neh..

Altebela39 said...

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